Beria et les services secrets

Laurenti Beria et les services secrets, au cœur du pouvoir soviétique et de la politique extérieure russe

12 mars 2012, 18h00-20h00

Paris

 

Intervenante : Françoise Thom, maître de conférences à l’université de Paris IV-Sorbonne

Séminaire «De l’URSS à la Russie, les évolutions du renseignement russe au XXe siècle», Metis (saison 9, séance 2), organisé par Olivier Forcade, Philippe Hayez et Sébastien Laurent

Contact: Marie-Laure Dagieu (marie-laure.dagieu@sciences-po.fr)

Lieu :

1er étage
Centre d’histoire de Sciences Po
56, rue Jacob 75006 Paris
T/+33 (0)1 58 71 71 07 – F/+33 (0)1 58 71 71 96
http://centre-histoire.sciences-po.fr

Lien : http://chsp.sciences-po.fr/evenement/de-lurss-la-russie-les-evolutions-du-renseignement-rus
se-au-xxe-siecle-metis-saison-9-se-0

guerre-froide

Le carnet de recherches «Autour du système de guerre froide» accompagne le séminaire du même nom organisé dans le cadre de l'UMR IRICE par Jenny Raflik et Émilia Robin Hivert.

More Posts

Anticommunisme et guerre psychologique en RFA

Soutenance de thèse – Bernard Ludwig (université Paris 1 Panthéon-Sorbonne) soutiendra sa thèse d’histoire sur le sujet :

«Anticommunisme et guerre psychologique en République fédérale d’Allemagne et en Europe (1950-1956). Démocratie, diplomaties et réseaux transnationaux»

 

Le mardi 6 décembre 2011 à 13h30 en Sorbonne (salle Jean-Baptiste Duroselle – Galerie Jean-Baptiste Dumas, 1 Rue Victor Cousin – 75005 Paris)

Jury :

  • Robert Frank, professeur à l’Université paris 1 Panthéon-Sorbonne, directeur de thèse
  • Hélène Miard-Delacroix, professeur à l’Université Paris-Sorbonne, rapporteur
  • Georges-Henri Soutou, professeur émérite à l’Université Paris-Sorbonne, rapporteur
  • Corine Defrance, chargée de recherche au CNRS
  • Wolfgang Krieger, professeur à la Philipps-Universität Marburg (Allemagne)

 

guerre-froide

Le carnet de recherches «Autour du système de guerre froide» accompagne le séminaire du même nom organisé dans le cadre de l'UMR IRICE par Jenny Raflik et Émilia Robin Hivert.

More Posts

« Trust, but Verify ». Confidence and Distrust from Détente to the End of the Cold War

« Trust, but Verify ». Confidence and Distrust from Détente to the End of the Cold War

7-9 November 2011

Washington DC

Scientific project: see the call for papers: http://guerre-froide.hypotheses.org/534

 

Monday, November 7

 

Location: German Historical Institute, Washington, DC

4:00 pm – Welcome at the GHI

4:15-5:30 pm – PANEL 1: The Personal Factor

Chair: Andreas Daum (SUNY, Buffalo)

  • Patrick Vaughan (Jagiellonian University, Krakow, Poland): Zbigniew Brzezinski as Mediator between the US, Poland, and Solidarity in the 1980s Soviet-Chinese Dimension
  • J. Simon Rofe (University of Leicester): Trust between Adversaries and Allies: President George H.W. Bush, Trust and the End of the Cold War

5:30-6:00 pm – Coffee Break

6:00-7:15 pm – Keynote Address

Ute Frevert (Max Planck Institute for Human Development): Emotions in History

7:15-9:00 pm – Reception at the GHI

Tuesday, November 8

 

Location: Woodrow Wilson Center for International Scholars

9:15-10:30 am – Keynote Address

Deborah Welch Larson (UCLA International Institute): Trust and Mistrust during the Cold War

10:30-11:00 am – Coffee Break

11:00-12:00 am – PANEL 2: Framing Trust: The Blocs at the Negotiation Table

Chair: Reinhild Kreis (University of Augsburg)

  • Michael Cotey Morgan (US Naval War College): Confidence and Distrust at the Conference on Security and Cooperation in urope (CSCE)
  • Sarah Snyder (University College London): Reagan, Trust, and Human Rights: The Vienna CSCE Review Meeting, 1986-1989

12:00-2:00 pm – Lunch Break

2:00-3:00 pm – PANEL 3: Inside the Blocs: East and West I

Chair: Sonya Michel (Woodrow Wilson Center, Washington, DC)

  • Jens Gieseke (Centre for Contemporary History, Potsdam): Whom Did East Germans Trust? Popular Opinion on Threats of War, Confrontation and Détente in the GDR, 1968-89
  • Jens Boysen (GHI Warsaw): « Brothers in Arms », but not really: East Germany and People’s Poland between Mutual Dependency and Mutual Distrust, 1975-1990

3:00-3:30 pm – Coffee Break

3:30-4:30 pm – PANEL 4: Inside the Blocs: East and West II

Chair: Nancy Gallagher (University of Maryland)

  • Emmanuel Mourlon-Druol (University of Glasgow): Institutionalizing Trust? Regular Summitry (G7s and European Councils) from the Mid-1970s until the Late 1980s
  • Noel Bonhomme (Université Paris-Sorbonne): Summitry and (Mis)trust: The Case of the G7 Summits, 1975-90

4:30-5:00 pm – Coffee Break

5:00-6:30 pm – PANEL 5: On the sidelines or in the middle? Small and neutral states

Chair: Christian Ostermann (Woodrow Wilson Center, Washington, DC)

  • Effie G. H. Pedaliu (University of the West of England-Bristol): ‘Footnotes’ as an Expression of Distrust? The US and the NATO ‘Flanks’ in the Last Two Decades of the Cold War
  • Aryo Makko (Stockholm University & Graduate Institute Geneva): A Neutral Trust Regime? Sweden and the Cold War, 1969-1991
  • Rinna Elina Kullaa (University of Jyväskylä, Finland): Foreign Policy of Neutralism as a Trust Building Mechanism: Finland, the Soviet Union and the United States, 1961-1975

 

Wednesday, November 9

 

Location: Woodrow Wilson Center for International Scholars

9:00-10:30 am – PANEL 6: Implementation and Verification

Chair: Jeffrey Herf (University of Maryland)

  • Arvid Schors (University of Freiburg, Germany): The History of the Strategic Arms Limitation Talks (SALT), 1969-1979
  • Laura Considine, Nicholas Wheeler (Aberystwyth University): Trust and Verification, 1985-1991
  • Joseph P. Harahan (U.S. Department of Defense): Building Confidence and Trust between the United States and the Soviet Union: Implementing the INF Treaty, 1988 -1991

10:30-11:00 am – Coffee Break

11:00-12:00 am – Concluding Discussion

Chair: Martin Klimke (GHI, Washington, DC)

Conveners: Martin Klimke (German Historical Institute, Washington, DC); Reinhild Kreis (History Department, University of Augsburg); Sonya Michel (United States Studies, Woodrow Wilson Center, Washington, DC); Christian Ostermann (Cold War International History Project, Woodrow Wilson Center, Washington, DC

For more information, please contact Dr. Martin Klimke (klimke@ghi-dc.org)

guerre-froide

Le carnet de recherches «Autour du système de guerre froide» accompagne le séminaire du même nom organisé dans le cadre de l'UMR IRICE par Jenny Raflik et Émilia Robin Hivert.

More Posts

Intelligence Services in Central Europe during the Cold War

Intelligence Services in Central Europe during the Cold War
Budapest
3 November 2011
Deadline for registration: 31 October 2011

 

During the Cold War, eastern and western secret services collided in Central Europe. Especially Austria was – above all as a result of its four-power occupation until 1955 – a hub for international espionage. It became a stamping ground for the secret and intelligence services of the Cold War protagonists, but also for services from neighbouring countries. Information on the other side was collected here, agents recruited and hostile activities exposed. The direct and indirect procurement of information quickly gained in strategic and political importance. Some Austrians, but also Hungarian emigrants, who had been recruited by, for example, the American military counterintelligence service CIC, were brought before Soviet military tribunals and received draconian sentences, even including death by shooting.

In the framework of this international conference, historians from Austria, Hungary, Denmark, Italy and the Czech Republic analyse the role and function of the intelligence services in Central Europe during the Cold War. Particular focus is placed here on Austria and the neighbouring states of Hungary and Czechoslovakia as well as on cooperation between Hungarian and Romanian state security services. Finally, the question will be pursued as to how agents and spies were recruited, and which consequences economic and scientific espionage had.

9.00 – Registration

9.15 – Welcome notes

  • Dir. Dr. Elisabeth Kornfeind, Austrian Cultural Forum Budapest
  • Doz. Dr. Barbara Stelzl-Marx, L. B. Institute for Research on War Consequences

9.30 – Introduction

Chair: Barbara Stelzl-Marx, L. B. Institute for Research on War Consequences

  • Thomas Wegener-Friis, University of Southern Denmark: Why European Intelligence Studies?
  • Siegfried Beer, University of Graz: Anglo-American Intelligence Services as Vanguard in Post-war Austria

10.30-11.00 – Coffee break

11.00-12.30 – Panel I: Hungary-related Intelligence Operations in Austria Chair: Siegfried Beer, University of Graz

  • Erwin Schmidl, Austrian National Defense Academy, Institute for Strategy and Security Policy: Contemporary History: Hot border in the Cold War: Secret Activities in Austria and Hungary
  • Magdolna Baráth, Historical Archives of Hungarian State Security: The activity of the Hungarian Intelligence Services on the territory of Austria 1944-1956
  • László Ritter, Institute of History of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences: The Hungary-related operations of the US Army’s Counter Intelligence Corps in Austria 1945-1958
  • Barbara Stelzl-Marx, L. B. Institute for Research on War Consequences: Shot Dead in Moscow: Hungarian Spies in Austria

Discussion

12.30-14.00 – Lunch

14.00-15.30 – Panel II: Central European Intelligence Services

Chair: Thomas Wegener-Friis, University of Southern Denmark

  • Philipp Lesiak, L. B. Institute for Research on War Consequences: Targets and interests of the Czechoslovak Intelligence Services in Austria 1945-1989
  • Katerina Lozoviukova, L. B. Institute for Research on War Consequences: Czechoslovak agents/couriers crossing the Austrian border: « Weapons » of the Cold War?
  • Stefano Bottoni, Institute of History of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences: Hungarian-Romanian state security cooperation and (later, from the early 1960s) conflicts

Discussion

15.30-16.00 – Coffee break

16.00-18.00 – Panel III: Recruitment and Industrial Espionage

Chair: László Ritter, Institute of History of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences

  • Harald Knoll, L. B. Institute for Research on War Consequences: The Broda Case: Austrian Scientists in the Focus of Foreign Intelligence Servies
  • Dieter Bacher, L. B. Institute for Research on War Consequences: The Recruitment of Austrian Citizens by Foreign Intelligence Services in Austria 1945-1953
  • Walter M. Iber, L. B. Institute for Research on War Consequences: Industrial Espionage. Western Powers and Soviet Companies in Austria 1945-1955
  • Peter Ruggenthaler, L. B. Institute for Research on War Consequences: The Soviet Military Intelligence GRU in Austria during the Occupation Era

Final Discussion

Contact:

Orsolya Nemeshazi (orsolya.nemeshazi@bmeia.gv.at)
Austrian Cultural Forum Budapest, Benczúr u. 16, 1068 Budapest
00361 413 3590

Sponsors: Austrian Cultural Forum Budapest; Danish Cultural Institute Budapest; Ludwig Boltzmann-Institut für Kriegsfolgen-Forschung; EUNIC

Venue: Budapest, Hungary, Austrian Cultural Forum Budapest, Benczúr u.
16, 1068 Budapest

guerre-froide

Le carnet de recherches «Autour du système de guerre froide» accompagne le séminaire du même nom organisé dans le cadre de l'UMR IRICE par Jenny Raflik et Émilia Robin Hivert.

More Posts

Guerre froide et espionnage naval

HUCHTHAUSEN, Peter A., SHELDON-DUPLAIX, Alexandre, et BOUDREAULT, Miville, Guerre froide et espionnage naval, Paris, Nouveau Monde éditions, août 2011, 548 p.

Présentation de l’éditeur:

Ignoré par les ouvrages traitant de la guerre froide, l’espionnage naval permit aux deux blocs d’utiliser les océans et les ports pour surveiller et pénétrer le camp adverse.

Nourri par des entretiens avec des protagonistes soviétiques et occidentaux, et par l’exploitation d’archives américaines, britanniques et de publications russes, ce récit fourmille d’anecdotes inédites, parfois terrifiantes. On y apprend qu’un cuirassé soviétique, ex-italien, explosa mystérieusement à Sébastopol en 1955, laissant croire à un sabotage par un prince fasciste, qu’un marin soviétique aurait obtenu d’un général français les plans de frappes de l’OTAN qui décidèrent Khrouchtchev à déployer des missiles à Cuba et qu’une erreur de traduction dans un message intercepté poussa Johnson à engager les États-Unis au Vietnam.

On y découvre qu’un capitaine de corvette soviétique servit d’instructeur au renseignement américain avant de disparaître dans des circonstances qui en faisaient un agent double ou triple, et qu’un officier-marinier de l’US. Navy livra les codes navals américains à Moscou pendant près de quinze ans. On comprend comment le président Reagan autorisa la marine américaine à mener des opérations de guerre psychologique et que l’échouage d’un sous-marin soviétique en Suède, suivi par des intrusions non élucidées retourna l’opinion suédoise en faveur de l’OTAN.

Enfin, cet ouvrage nous montre que des objets sous-marins ou aériens non identifiés conduisirent les États-Unis et l’URSS à édicter des instructions troublantes.

Ancien attaché naval des États-Unis à Belgrade, Bucarest puis Moscou, le capitaine de vaisseau Peter A. Huchthausen (mort en juillet 2008) est l’auteur de trois livres sur la marine soviétique. Alexandre Sheldon-Duplaix, chercheur depuis 1999 au Service historique de la Défense (Vincennes), enseigne à l’école militaire. Il a travaillé au ministère de la Défense de 1987à 1999 et publié trois ouvrages sur les sous-marins et les porte-avions.

guerre-froide

Le carnet de recherches «Autour du système de guerre froide» accompagne le séminaire du même nom organisé dans le cadre de l'UMR IRICE par Jenny Raflik et Émilia Robin Hivert.

More Posts

Figures du renseignement européen

Figures du renseignement européen

26 septembre 2011, 18h00-20h00

Paris

 

Séance 1 du séminaire «Figures du renseignement européen – Metis saison 8», organisé par Olivier Forcade, Philippe Hayez et Sébastien Laurent. Pour en savoir plus sur le séminaire : http://chsp.sciences-po.fr/groupe-de-recherche/metis-le-renseignement-et-les-societes-democratiques

Intervenant : Julien Florent (Université de Paris-Sorbonne, Paris IV) : «Aux origines d’un renseignement européen, les coopérations françaises en matière de renseignement au début de la guerre froide»

Renseignements : http://chsp.sciences-po.fr/evenement/figures-du-renseignement-europeen-metis-saison-8-seance-1

Lieu : CHSP, 1er étage, 56 rue Jacob, 75006 Paris

guerre-froide

Le carnet de recherches «Autour du système de guerre froide» accompagne le séminaire du même nom organisé dans le cadre de l'UMR IRICE par Jenny Raflik et Émilia Robin Hivert.

More Posts

Intelligence and Politics. Western and Eastern Perspectives

Need to Know: Intelligence and Politics. Western and Eastern Perspectives

8-9 novembre 2011

Bruxelles

 

One of the side-effects of the collapse of the communist system in Central/Eastern Europe was that hitherto highly classified data on key aspects of intelligence operations in some Warsaw Pact countries became relatively easily accessible. These data concerned such fundamental issues as: the impact of intelligence information on political decisions; international intelligence networks; data circulation and processing; goals, methods, and forms of intelligence work; information sources and intelligence operations; and intelligence as an organization.

The main aim of the conference is to confront the experience of scholars from Central/Eastern Europe, who analyze such materials on a daily basis, with research methodologies developed in Western Europe and the United States.

The conference will focus on modern intelligence from the World War II to the War on Terror, however with a emphasis on the Cold War.

The conference, conceived as an event accompanying the Polish presidency in the European Union, is scheduled to take place at the South Denmark House and the European Parliament in Brussels on 8-9 November 2011. It is co-organized by: Paweł Zalewski, MEP (European People’s Party), Institute of National Remembrance – Commission for the Prosecution of Crimes against the Polish Nation i Center for Cold War Studies of the University of Southern Denmark.

English will be the language of the conference.

Due to security procedures at the European Parliament, those who wish to participate in the conference as auditors are requested to register (by 30 August 2011) by filling in the attached form (download form) and mailing it back to the organizers. Conference participation is free of charge.

For additional information and registration please contact: anna.piekarska@ipn.gov.pl

Tuesday, 8 November 2011

 

9.00-11.30 – Opening Session

  • Dr Władysław Bułhak (Poland) – New Vision of Intelligence during the Cold War – Eastern Perspective
  • Prof. Thomas Friis (Denmark) – Why European Intelligence Studies?
  • Dr Sławomir Łukasiewicz (Poland) – Spies in Brussels. Polish Communists intelligence in the European institutions during the Cold War period

12.30-13.30 – Lunch break

13.30-15.15 – Session II: HUMINT, part 1

Chair – Prof. Andrzej Paczkowski (Poland)

  • Prof. Idesbald Goddeeris (Belgium) – Belgian and Polish Secret Services during the Cold War
  • Prof. Mark Kramer (USA) – CIA Assessments of Warsaw Pact Capabilities and Intentions
  • Dr Helmut Müller-Enbergs (Germany) – How successful was the Stasi really in the West?
  • Dr Patryk Pleskot (Poland) – DIPLOMAT MEANS SPY. Intelligence activity of Western embassies in Warsaw in the view of the Polish counter-espionage service (1956-1989)

14.30-15.15 – Discussion

15.15-15.30 – Coffee break

15.30-16.45 – Session III: Terror

Chair – Dr Łukasz Kamiński (Poland)

  • Przemysław Gasztold-Seń (Poland) – Between Geopolitics and the National Security. Polish Civilian Intelligence and International Terrorism During the Cold War
  • Prof. Kostadin Grozev (Bulgaria) – Ideology and Pragmatism: NATO v.  Warsaw Pact Countries Approaches to Combating International Terrorism in the late Cold War Period (the case of Bulgaria)
  • Steve Hewitt (United Kingdom) – The Use of Informers by US Domestic Security Agencies and the Controversy Surrounding Them from the Cold War to the War on Terror

16.15-16.45 – Discussion

Wednesday, 9 November 2011

 

9.00-10.40 – Session IV: HUMINT, part 2

Chair – Prof. Erik Kulavig (Denmark)

  • Dieter Bacher (Austria) – The Recruitment of Austrian Citizens by Foreign Intelligence Services in Austria from 1945 to 1953
  • Prof. Kimmo Elo (Finland) – A Spider Spinning Its Web: The East German Foreign Intelligence in the Nordic Countries
  • Kurt Jensen, Don Munton (Canada) – International Intelligence Liaison: Canada and the Central Intelligence Agency in the Early Cold War Years
  • PhD Matej Medvecky (Slovakia) – Czechoslovak Foreign Intelligence Service and its activities in Great Britain in the first two decades of Cold War

10.00-10.40 – discussion

10.40-11.00 – Coffee break

 

11.00-12.45 – Session V: International Relations

Chair – Prof. Christian Ostermann (USA)

  • Prof. Jordan Baev (Bulgaria) – The Soviet Bloc Intelligence Information Exchange: Stages, Intensity, Framework, Reliability, and Effectiveness
  • Dr Douglas Selvage (Germany/USA) – Intelligence-Gathering and Active Measures: The East European Security Services and the CSCE Process, 1977-1983
  • Prof. Jacek Tebinka (Poland) – Intelligence Dimension in Anglo-Polish Relations 1945-1980/1981
  • Prof. Jakub Tyszkiewicz (Poland) – The Impact of Analyses prepared by American « Intelligence Community » on U.S. Policy toward Poland in 1956-1970

12.00-12.45 – discussion

12.45-14.00 – Lunch break

 

14.00-15.20 – Session VI: Decision-making, part 1

Chair – Sir Rodric Quentin Braithwaite (United Kingdom)

  • Prof. Nadia Boyadijeva (Bulgaria) – Intelligence Support of UN Peacekeeping Operations during the Cold War and After
  • Baptiste Colom-Y-Canals (France) – The Construction of the French Strategic Air Intelligence 1949-1972: Study on the evolution of a decision making tool
  • Dr Michael Goodman (United Kingdom) – The British Joint Intelligence Committee and the Prediction of International Crises

14.45-15.20 – Discussion

15.20-15.40 – Coffee break

 

15.40-17.30 – Session VII: Decision-making, part 2

Chair – Dr Krzysztof Persak (Poland)

  • Dr Ben de Jong (Netherlands) – The KGB and the CPSU
  • PhD Valery Katzunov (Bulgaria) – The First Main Directorate of Bulgarian State Security: A Foreign Intelligence Unit or a Bulgarian Communist Party Sub-division
  • Molly Pucci (USA) – `News From Home’: Wartime Intelligence and Post-war Security in Czechoslovakia, 1938-1946
  • Dr Aleksandar Zivotic (Serbia) – Yugoslav Intelligence and Foreign Policy decision-making during the Cold War

16.40-17.30 – discussion

17.30-17.45 – Conclusion

Website: http://ipn.gov.pl/

(L’appel à communications du colloque est paru sur ce carnet de recherches : http://guerre-froide.hypotheses.org/807)

guerre-froide

Le carnet de recherches «Autour du système de guerre froide» accompagne le séminaire du même nom organisé dans le cadre de l'UMR IRICE par Jenny Raflik et Émilia Robin Hivert.

More Posts

Soviet espionage and the Cold War

The Rosenberg case, Soviet Espionage, and the Cold War

22 June 2011

Washington

 

PANEL 1, 9:00 AM to 10:45 — Historical Treatment of the Rosenberg Case

Chair: Joseph K. McLaughlin, President, International Epidemiology Institute, and Professor of Medicine, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine

  • Allen M. Hornblum, Former Executive Director, Americans for Democratic Action, and Author, The Invisible Harry Gold
  • Kathryn S. Olmsted, Professor of History, University of California at Davis
  • Athan G. Theoharis, Professor of History Emeritus, Marquette University
  • Steven Usdin, Author, Engineering Communism, and Senior Editor, BioCentury

 

PANEL 2, 11:00 PM to 12:45 PM — The Rosenberg Case and the Historiography of Soviet Espionage in America

Chair: Max Holland, Editor, Washington Decoded

  • Bruce Craig, Assistant Professor of History, University of Prince Edward Island
  • John Earl Haynes, Modern Political Historian, Manuscripts Division, Library of Congress, and Harvey Klehr,Professor of Political Science, Emory University
  • Ronald Radosh, Adjunct Senior Fellow, The Hudson Institute, and Professor of History Emeritus, CUNY
  • Ellen Schrecker, Professor of History, Yeshiva University

 

 

PANEL 3, 1:45 PM to 3:30 PM — Nuclear Espionage, the Soviet Bomb, and the Cold War

Chair:  Alexander Vassiliev, former Soviet foreign intelligence officer

  • Barton J. Bernstein, Professor of History Emeritus, Stanford University
  • Michael Gordin, Professor of History, Princeton University
  • James G. Hershberg, Professor of History, George Washington University
  • Mark Kramer, Director, Cold War Studies Program, Harvard University
  • John Prados, Senior Research Fellow, National Security Archive

 

PANEL 4, 3:45 PM to 5:30 PM — Soviet Espionage and Its Implications for Anti-Communism and Domestic Politics in the United States

Chair: Richard Gid Powers, Professor of History, College of Staten Island

  • Eric Arnesen, Professor of History, George Washington University
  • David J. Garrow, Senior Research Fellow, Homerton College, Cambridge University
  • Jason Roberts, History/Government Instructor, Quincy College
  • Katherine Sibley, Professor of History, St. Joseph’s University

Observer: Sam Roberts, Reporter, The New York Times; and Author, The Brother

Venue: State Room, 7th Floor, Elliott School of International Affairs George Washington University, Washington, DC

The conference is free and open to the public.

Contact: john.earl.haynes@gmail.com
~

guerre-froide

Le carnet de recherches «Autour du système de guerre froide» accompagne le séminaire du même nom organisé dans le cadre de l'UMR IRICE par Jenny Raflik et Émilia Robin Hivert.

More Posts

Diplomacy and Statecraft (22/1, 2011)

Diplomacy & Statecraft, vol. 22, no. 1, hiver 2011

Effie G. H. Pedaliu and John W. Young, « Introduction: Professor Saki R.  Dockrill (1952-2009) », p. 1-3

Articles

  • Christopher Baxter, « A Closed Book? British Intelligence and East Asia, 1945-1950 », p. 4-27.
  • Wolfgang Krieger, « German-American Intelligence Relations, 1945-1956: New Evidence on the Origins of the BND », p. 28-43.
  • Geoffrey Warner, « Anglo-American Relations and the Cold War in 1950 », p.  44-60.
  • Günter Bischof, « United States Responses to the Soviet Suppression of Rebellions in the German Democratic Republic, Hungary, and Czechoslovakia », p. 61-80.
  • John W. Young, « Ambassador David Bruce and ‘LBJ’s War’: Vietnam Viewed from London, 1963-1968 », p. 81-100.
  • Effie G. H. Pedaliu, « ‘A Discordant Note’: NATO and the Greek Junta, 1967-1974 », p. 101-120.
  • Thomas A. Schwartz, « Henry Kissinger: Realism, Domestic Politics, and the Struggle Against Exceptionalism in American Foreign Policy », p.  121-141.
  • Geraint Hughes, « The Cold War and Counter-Insurgency », p. 142-163.

Compte-rendus

  • G. R. Berridge (2009). British Diplomacy in Turkey, 1583 to the Present.  A Study in the Evolution of the Resident Embassy (p. 164-166, par Saul Kelly).
  • K. Robbins, and J. Fisher (Eds.) (2010). Religion and Diplomacy: Religion and British Foreign Policy, 1815 to 1941 (p. 167-169, par Peter J. Beck).
  • Y. Alon, (2009). The Making of Jordan: Tribes, Colonialism and the Modern State (p. 170-171, par Nigel Ashton).
  • W. Borodziej, S. Debski, (Eds.), Polish Documents on Foreign Policy, 24 October 1938-30 September 1939 (p. 172-174, par Anna M. Cienciala).
  • R. Wigg (2008). Churchill and Spain. The Survival of the Franco Regime, 1940-1945 (p. 175-177, par Tim Rees).

guerre-froide

Le carnet de recherches «Autour du système de guerre froide» accompagne le séminaire du même nom organisé dans le cadre de l'UMR IRICE par Jenny Raflik et Émilia Robin Hivert.

More Posts

Intelligence and Politics: Western and Eastern Perspectives

« Need to Know: Intelligence and Politics: Western and Eastern Perspectives »

Date: 8-9 novembre 2011, Bruxelles

Date limite de réponse : 15 mai 2011

One of the side-effects of the collapse of the communist system in Central/Eastern Europe was that hitherto highly classified data on key aspects of intelligence operations in some Warsaw Pact countries became relatively easily accessible. These data concerned such fundamental issues as: the impact of intelligence information on political decisions; international intelligence networks; data circulation and processing; goals, methods, and forms of intelligence work; information sources and intelligence operations; and intelligence as an organization.

The main aim of the conference is to confront the experience of scholars from Central/Eastern Europe, who analyze such materials on a daily basis, with research methodologies developed in Western Europe and the United States.

The conference will focus on modern intelligence from the World War II to the War on Terror, however with a emphasis on the Cold War. We do not, however, wish to limit ourselves by this time frame, for we are more concerned with a series of issues worth considering within a comparative framework. We are also mindful of the fact that in the recently announced Stockholm Program the European Union asserted a stronger role in the field at stake (most notably the exchange of intelligence information).

The list of issues we consider worth raising includes (but is not limited to):

  • New sources/new possibilities/advanced analytical methods in intelligence research.
  • The place of intelligence within the political system.
  • Mechanism of state control over intelligence services.
  • The significance of intelligence-gathering in East-West relations during the Cold War,
  • The role of intelligence data in decision-making in international politics.
  • Information processing in intelligence circles and the impact of specific modes of processing on the quality of intelligence information.
  • Strengths and weaknesses of intelligence information sources (human, technical, and open), particularly human sources (HUMINT).
  • The worldview of intelligence officers, its sources (esprit de corps, education, origins, gender) and its influence on the quality of intelligence information.
  • Academic research at the service of intelligence-gathering – intelligence at the service of science and technology (ethics, psychology, mathematics, and technical sciences).
  • Case studies of intelligence operations that offer valid lessons for European security (e.g.  with respect to such issues as terrorism, immigration and migration, national and religious minority communities, economic, scientific, and technological espionage, disinformation, secret operations, etc.).

Contact:

Anna Piekarska
Institute of National Remembrance
Public Education Office
ul. Towarowa 28
00-839 Warszawa
POLAND

Email: anna.piekarska@ipn.gov.pl

Place: Brussels, Belgium (The South Denmark House and the European Parliament)

Organizers: Pawel Zalewski, MEP (European People’s Party), Institute of National Remembrance – Commission for the Prosecution of Crimes against the Polish Nation, Center for Cold War Studies of the University of Southern Denmark, and the Institute of Political Studies of the Polish Academy of Sciences.

Further details and registration forms available at: http://www.ipn.gov.pl/conference2011brussels

guerre-froide

Le carnet de recherches «Autour du système de guerre froide» accompagne le séminaire du même nom organisé dans le cadre de l'UMR IRICE par Jenny Raflik et Émilia Robin Hivert.

More Posts