Cold War Democracy. The United States and Japan

Miller, Jennifer M., Cold War Democracy: The United States and Japan, Cambridge, Harvard University Press, 2019, 368 p.

Présentation de l’éditeur

A fresh reappraisal of Japan’s relationship with the United States that reveals how the Cold War shaped Japan and transformed America’s understanding of what it takes to establish a postwar democracy.

Is American foreign policy a reflection of a desire to promote democracy, or is it motivated by America’s economic interests and imperial dreams? Jennifer Miller argues that democratic ideals were indeed crucial in the early days of the U.S.–Japanese relationship, but not in the way most defenders claim. American leaders believed that building a peaceful, stable, and democratic Japan after a devastating war required much more than elections or a new constitution. Instead, they saw democracy as a psychological and even spiritual “state of mind,” a vigilant society perpetually mobilized against the false promises of fascist and communist anti-democratic forces. These ideas inspired an unprecedented crusade to help the Japanese achieve the individualistic and rational qualities deemed necessary for democracy.

These American ambitions confronted vigorous Japanese resistance. Activists mobilized against U.S. policy, surrounding U.S. military bases and staging protests to argue that a true democracy must be accountable to the Japanese people. In the face of these protests, leaders from both the United States and Japan maintained their commitment to building a psychologically “healthy” democracy. During the occupation, American policymakers identified elections and education as the wellsprings of a new consciousness, but as the extent of Japan’s remarkable economic recovery became clear, they increasingly placed prosperity at the core of a revised vision for their new ally’s future. Cold War Democracy reveals how these ideas and conflicts informed American policies, including the decision to rebuild the Japanese military and distribute U.S. economic assistance and development throughout Asia.

Jennifer M. Miller is Assistant Professor of History at Dartmouth College, where she teaches courses on American foreign policy and the Cold War.

Table des matières

Acronyms

Introduction

1. Democracy as a State of Mind

2. Militarizing Democracy

3. The San Francisco Peace Treaty4. Bloody Sunagawa

5. A Breaking Point

6. Producing Democracy

Conclusion

Abbreviations, notes, acknowledgments, index

Pour en savoir plus – page de référence : https://www.hup.harvard.edu/catalog.php?isbn=9780674976344 – Table ronde H-Diplo publiée le 9 décembre 2019 : https://networks.h-net.org/node/28443/discussions/5506875/h-diplo-roundtable-xxi-19-cold-war-democracy%C2%A0-united-states-and

Couverture de Miller, Cold War Democracy


Emilia Robin

Chercheuse associée à l'UMR SIRICE. Violons d'Ingres : guerre froide, médiation scientifique, logiciels libres

Vous aimerez aussi...

Laisser un commentaire

Votre adresse e-mail ne sera pas publiée. Les champs obligatoires sont indiqués avec *

Ce site utilise Akismet pour réduire les indésirables. En savoir plus sur comment les données de vos commentaires sont utilisées.

Rechercher dans OpenEdition Search

Vous allez être redirigé vers OpenEdition Search